10/10/2016 11:12:32
Robert Perkins
Destructive interference can be used to see through fog using a technology reminiscent of noise-canceling headphones.
image of the results of glare suppression
08/18/2013 10:00:33
Katie Neith
The human body is full of tiny microorganisms, and the GI tract is home to the largest concentration and highest diversity of bacterial species. But how do these organisms persist and thrive in a system that is constantly in flux due to foods and fluids moving through it? A team led by Caltech biologist Sarkis Mazmanian believes it has found the answer, at least in one common group of bacteria: a set of genes that promotes stable microbial colonization of the gut.
06/11/2013 07:00:45
Marcus Woo
Researchers have used a well-known, noninvasive technique to electrically stimulate a specific region deep inside the brain, causing volunteers to judge faces as more attractive than before their brains were stimulated.
05/21/2013 09:58:03
Katie Neith
A team of researchers led by biologists at Caltech has found that, in mouse models, the molecule microRNA-146a (miR-146a) acts as a critical regulator and protector of blood-forming stem cells during chronic inflammation, suggesting that a deficiency of miR-146a may be one important cause of blood cancers and bone marrow failure.
03/26/2013 08:07:51
Kimm Fesenmaier
Engineers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), working with a collaborator from the Jerusalem-based company LeukoDx, have developed a portable device to count white blood cells that needs less than a pinprick's worth of blood and takes just minutes to run.
03/25/2013 07:55:41
Katie Neith
Biologists at Caltech have found that neural-crest stem cells—multipotent, migratory cells unique to vertebrates that give rise to many structures in the body such as facial bones and smooth muscle—play a key role in building olfactory sensory neurons in the nose.
12/04/2012 20:58:21
Douglas Smith
Viviana Gradinaru (BS '05) might one day be getting inside your head—but in a good way. An assistant professor of biology at Caltech, Gradinaru is trying to map out the brain's wiring diagrams. Gradinaru will discuss her work at 8:00 p.m. on Wednesday, December 5, in Caltech's Beckman Auditorium. Admission is free.
11/18/2012 17:43:42
Michael Rogers
Origami—the Japanese art of paper folding—could play a critical role in electrical engineer Azita Emami's project to design an artificial retina, which may one day help thousands of blind and visually impaired people regain their vision.
10/31/2012 16:19:02
Katie Neith
A Caltech-led team has discovered the enzyme responsible for the development of neural crest cells in vertebrates.
10/25/2012 11:40:34
Michael Rogers
Caltech engineers, who last year helped enable a paraplegic man to stand and move his legs voluntarily, have developed a new method to automate the system, which provides epidural electrical stimulation to people with spinal-cord injuries. This advancement could make the technology widely available to rehab clinics and thousands of patients worldwide.
10/10/2012 16:00:33
Douglas Smith
Last summer, Caltech junior Julie Jester worked on a project that might one day partially counteract blindness caused by a deteriorating retina. Her job: to help Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering Azita Emami and her graduate students create the communications link between a tiny camera and a novel wireless neural stimulator that can be surgically inserted into the eye.
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