News articles tagged with "medical_science"

11/13/2014 09:33:52
Kimm Fesenmaier
Caltech and City of Hope have signed a memorandum of understanding, formalizing a relationship that encourages researchers from the two institutions to collaborate and share resources in the interest of furthering both basic scientific research and translational projects—those with a medical application. The memorandum establishes the Arthur D. Riggs Distinguished Lectureship series, which will bring scientists from across the country to speak at Caltech and City of Hope on current projects in basic research as well as on efforts to predict, prevent, diagnose, treat, and cure such diseases as cancer, diabetes, and HIV.
10/10/2012 16:00:33
Douglas Smith
Last summer, Caltech junior Julie Jester worked on a project that might one day partially counteract blindness caused by a deteriorating retina. Her job: to help Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering Azita Emami and her graduate students create the communications link between a tiny camera and a novel wireless neural stimulator that can be surgically inserted into the eye.
07/12/2012 07:00:00
Michael Rogers

. Now, an endowment established by the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Foundation will strengthen the Caltech-UCLA partnership and advance the Baltimore lab’s interdisciplinary research into areas where mathematics and engineering converge with biology.

06/27/2012 07:00:00
Kimm Fesenmaier

Caltech researchers have been able, for the first time, to watch viruses infecting individual bacteria by transferring their DNA, and to measure the rate at which that transfer occurs.

06/26/2012 15:00:00
Marcus Woo
Imagine if doctors could perform surgery without ever having to cut through your skin. Or if they could diagnose cancer by seeing tumors inside the body with a procedure that is as simple as an ultrasound. Thanks to a technique developed by engineers at Caltech, all of that may be possible in the not-so-distant future.
02/29/2012 08:00:00
Kimm Fesenmaier

Nearly all motile bacteria can sense and respond to their surroundings through a process called chemotaxis, which begins with proteins known as chemoreceptors. Now researchers at Caltech have built the first model that depicts precisely how chemoreceptors and the proteins around them are structured at the sensing tip of bacteria. Because chemotaxis plays a critical role in the first steps of bacterial infection, a better understanding of the process could pave the way for the development of new, more effective antibiotics.

02/08/2012 08:00:00
Katie Neith

Researchers from Caltech now believe they have found a way to help the brain replace damaged myelin, a material that forms a protective cape around the axons of our nerve cells so that they can send signals quickly and efficiently.

01/13/2012 08:00:00
Kimm Fesenmaier

A team of researchers at Caltech has devised a new method for making complex molecules. The reaction they have come up with could open up new avenues for the development of novel pharmaceuticals and natural products from chemotherapeutic compounds to bioactive plant materials such as morphine.

12/08/2011 08:00:00
Kimm Fesenmaier

Rustem Ismagilov, the new John W. and Herberta M. Miles Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering at Caltech, believes in the ability of science and technology to address significant societal problems—from the spread of HIV and drug resistance to bacterial imbalances in the gut.

11/30/2011 08:00:00
Katie Neith

Over the past year, researchers at Caltech, and around the world, have been studying a group of potent antibodies that have the ability to neutralize HIV in the lab; their hope is that they may learn how to create a vaccine that makes antibodies with similar properties. Now, biologists at Caltech led by Nobel Laureate David Baltimore have taken one step closer to that goal: they have developed a way to deliver these antibodies to mice and, in so doing, have effectively protected them from HIV infection.

 

10/27/2011 18:00:00
Katie Neith

Using highly potent antibodies isolated from HIV-positive people, researchers have recently begun to identify ways to broadly neutralize the many possible subtypes of HIV. Now, a team led by biologists at Caltech has built upon one of these naturally occurring antibodies to create a stronger version they believe is a better candidate for clinical applications. 

 

Subscribe to Caltech News tagged with "medical_science"