News articles tagged with "materials_science"

11/07/2014 16:04:49
Jessica Stoller-Conrad
New faculty member Katherine Faber, the Simon Ramo Professor of Materials Science, studies the reasons why brittle ceramics fracture—and how these materials can be made stronger in the future.
02/11/2013 14:14:33
Douglas Smith
What makes an earthquake go off? Why are earthquakes so difficult to forecast? Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Geophysics Nadia Lapusta gives us a close-up look at the moving parts, as it were, at 8:00 p.m. on Wednesday, February 13, 2013, in Caltech's Beckman Auditorium. Admission is free.
01/22/2013 09:40:51
Douglas Smith
At Caltech, Guruswami "Ravi" Ravichandran studies impacts that pack a wallop of up to a million times the pressure of Earth's atmosphere.
11/25/2012 21:05:01
Douglas Smith
José Andrade has got the dirt on dirt. An associate professor of civil and mechanical engineering at Caltech, Andrade will discuss how the actions of a few grains of sand can affect landslides, earthquakes, and even Mars rovers. He will be speaking at 8:00 p.m. on Wednesday, November 28, 2012, in Caltech's Beckman Auditorium. Admission is free.
11/15/2012 13:21:03
Kimm Fesenmaier
In order to build the next generation of nuclear reactors, materials scientists are trying to unlock the secrets of certain materials that are radiation-damage tolerant. Now Caltech researchers have brought new understanding to one of those secrets—how the interfaces between two carefully selected metals can absorb, or heal, radiation damage.
11/12/2012 20:12:54
Douglas Smith
David G. Goodwin, professor of mechanical engineering and applied physics, emeritus, passed away at his home in Pasadena on Sunday, November 11, 2012, after a five-year battle with brain cancer and a struggle with Parkinson's disease that began in 1998. He was 55 years old.
10/29/2012 09:16:50
Brian Bell

Julia Greer is going to need to find space in her office for all of the awards, medals, and grant acceptance letters she has been receiving lately.

10/01/2012 15:50:43
Kimm Fesenmaier
Caltech engineers and scientists often work at the frontiers of science—pushing the limits of what is known and what is possible. Now, with its eighth annual Breakthrough Awards, Popular Mechanics magazine is recognizing two projects that fall into this category and in which Caltech faculty members have played major roles—the development of ultralight micro-lattices by materials scientist Julia Greer and colleagues, and the Voyager 1 and 2 missions, whose project scientist, physicist Ed Stone, has been at Caltech for the missions' entire 35-year ride.
05/22/2012 07:00:00
Kimm Fesenmaier

As part of a newly-funded Army collaboration, six Caltech engineers and applied scientists will investigate what happens to protective materials during intense impact.

03/22/2012 07:00:00
Marcus Woo

In the continual quest for better thermoelectric materials—which convert heat into electricity and vice versa—researchers have identified a liquid-like compound whose properties give it the potential to be even more efficient than traditional thermoelectrics.

12/15/2011 08:00:00
Kimm Fesenmaier

Caltech chemists have developed a hypothesis to explain strange behavior of high-temperature superconductors—copper oxides, or cuprates, that conduct electricity without a shred of resistance at temperatures much higher than other superconducting metals.

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