04/28/2016 17:42:45
Jessica Stoller-Conrad
Historian of science Asif Siddiqi sheds light on forgotten global contributions to the space race.
02/18/2016 09:33:14
Kimm Fesenmaier
The events are free and designed to engage the public in astronomy and to give everyone an opportunity to view the night sky through a telescope.
11/17/2015 09:55:11
Douglas Smith
The road to becoming a T cell is fraught with choices, false starts, and dead ends, where a regulatory tug-of-war brings cells surprisingly close to the border of leukemia.
Fluorescence-labeled immature T cells
10/12/2015 13:42:34
Douglas Smith
Rosetta, named for the inscribed stone that allowed 19th-century historians to unlock the secrets of ancient Egypt, is unlocking the secrets of a far more ancient comet.
Composite Rosetta image of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.
05/18/2015 10:49:11
Douglas Smith
Conservation scientists and materials scientists use the same methods to work toward very different ends: conservation scientists study the treasures of the past, whereas materials scientists create the everyday stock of the future. Professor Faber does both.
Scanning an oil painting with an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer.
05/05/2015 10:44:15
Douglas Smith
For a brief instant after the Big Bang, the universe flew apart at speeds faster than light; the gravitational waves from this expansion sowed the seeds of galaxies. Caltech professor Jamie Bock is hunting for an echo of these waves in the cosmic microwave background.
BICEP2 at the South Pole
03/27/2015 08:49:26
Douglas Smith
Finding an anti-AIDS vaccine remains an elusive goal—partly because the HIV virus quickly mutates to evade the vaccine's antibodies. In a Watson Lecture on April 1, Caltech's Pamela J. Bjorkman will describe ways to neutralize that mutational advantage.
02/02/2015 11:24:04
Douglas Smith
It is often said that people who do not learn from history are doomed to repeat it. John P. O'Doherty, professor of psychology and director of the Caltech Brain Imaging Center, discusses our current understanding of how we learn from experience.
fMRI scans of brain regions involved in value judgements
01/21/2015 10:11:46
Douglas Smith
Caltech professor Julia Greer is showing that the relationship between strength and weight is not graven in stone by creating brand-new materials that are incredibly strong but weigh next to nothing.
A fractal nanotruss made in Greer's lab.
01/06/2015 06:16:26
Douglas Smith
Professor of Biochemistry Bil Clemons is focused on working out the structures of and biological processes associated with membrane proteins—assemblies of protein molecules that act as transport channels through the greasy lipid membrane that encapsulates a cell.
Caltech Professor of Biochemistry Bil Clemons
12/15/2014 09:46:33
Douglas Smith
Integrating optics and electronics into systems such as fiber-optic data links has revolutionized how we transmit information. A second revolution awaits as researchers seek to develop chips in which individual atoms control the movement of light within the chip through optical "wires," and photons could replace electrons as the vehicle for performing computations. Andrei Faraon (BS '04), an assistant professor of applied physics and materials science in the Division of Engineering and Applied Science, presents a preview of this revolution at 8 p.m. on Wednesday, December 17, in Caltech's Beckman Auditorium. Admission is free.
An optical bench in the Faraon lab.
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