News articles tagged with "humanities"

04/07/2014 15:02:47
Cynthia Eller

It is a banner spring in Pasadena for the classical Greek mathematician Archimedes of Syracuse. Exhibits at Caltech and the Huntington Library highlight the work of Archimedes, as it has made its way into the modern era.

01/22/2014 09:59:48
Douglas Smith
Lance Edwin Davis, Caltech's Mary Stillman Harkness Professor of Social Science, Emeritus, passed away on Monday, January 20, 2014, at age 85. Davis was a pioneer of "cliometrics"—from Clio, the Greek muse of history—which applies modern economic theories and mathematical techniques to economic systems that no longer exist, such as the New England textile industry. These analyses required him to sift through the data buried in such things as whalers' logs from New Bedford, Massachusetts, or the records of the East India Company in order to test his hypotheses about how defunct industries and empires actually worked. "In the process," says Philip Hoffman, the Rea A. and Lela G. Axline Professor of Business Economics and professor of history, "economic history became part of economics and the whole field was remade." Davis was also instrumental in establishing Caltech's social science doctoral program, a combination of economics and political science with a uniquely mathematical approach.
01/16/2014 12:40:04
Cynthia Eller
The new lecture series is intended to bring together a diverse community to discuss the broad theme of exploration, from antiquity to the present day, from new lands on Earth to other planets in our solar system.
11/08/2013 11:27:16
Cynthia Eller
A revival of the opera "Einstein on the Beach" afforded an opportunity for the Einstein Papers Project to display some of its treasures: prized portraits, plus texts and images from Einstein's life.
11/01/2013 11:56:08
Cynthia Eller
The humanities' interest in the material has given rise to a new collaboration between Caltech and the Huntington Library, a two-year pilot program exploring texts and images through the lens of the material.
10/01/2013 08:33:19
Cynthia Eller

Determining cause and effect is complex and fraught with difficulty, from our intuitive—but often mistaken—sense of the causes of events in our daily lives to the perils of structuring and inte

10/28/2012 16:38:27
Marcus Woo
This fall, Jennifer Jahner joined Caltech as an assistant professor of English. As an undergraduate, she planned to study environmental science at Western Washington University. But as a lifelong reader, she couldn't elude the lure of literature, and she ended up majoring in English instead, receiving her BA in 1998. Afterward, she spent several years as a book editor before returning to academia as a graduate student at the University of Colorado, Boulder, where she took a seminar on medieval literature—a class that she says changed her life. Discovering a passion for the time period and for studying old, rare manuscripts, she got her MA in 2005 and then went to the University of Pennsylvania, where she received her PhD last spring. Jahner recently answered a few questions about her research and her thoughts on joining Caltech.
09/26/2012 08:59:50
Kimm Fesenmaier
A new volume in the Einstein Papers Project is scheduled to be released on September 25. This volume covers a turbulent 15 months in the physicist's life and includes several hundred previously unpublished and unknown articles and letters, some of which express his desire for "a normal life."
06/20/2012 07:00:00
Marcus Woo

Tom Harris came to Caltech with an undeclared major, thinking he would study computer science. But, having been an avid Lego builder as a kid, he was drawn to mechanical engineering. He also has an interest in medieval history, which similarly dates back to his childhood—he loved pirates and knights, and both his parents were history majors—and after he took Brown's medieval history class, his impression of the study of history changed.

12/04/2006 08:00:00
John Avery
How did the West conquer the world? The secret, says California Institute of Technology economic historian Philip T. Hoffman: technological innovation.
 
03/09/2006 08:00:00
Robert Tindol
Those who think that philosophy is about a bunch of dead guys with names like Plato and Kant and Hume will be surprised to learn that the philosophy of science is active and vibrant these days. What's more, some of the work currently being done in the field is as relevant to our daily concerns as the question of whether a certain new cancer drug is being tested properly in clinical trials.
 
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