News articles tagged with "HIV"

02/09/2014 10:05:05
Kimm Fesenmaier
"The method that we developed has now been validated in the most natural possible setting in a mouse," says David Baltimore, president emeritus and the Robert Andrews Millikan Professor of Biology at Caltech.
08/18/2010 23:00:00
Lori Oliwenstein

Two scientists from Caltech have been recognized by the National Institutes of Health for their innovative and high-impact biomedical research programs. Michael Roukes, professor of physics, applied physics, and bioengineering, and co-director of the Kavli Nanoscience Institute, and Pamela Bjorkman, Caltech's Max Delbrück Professor of Biology and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator, now join the 81 Pioneers who have been selected since the program's inception in 2004.

 

04/02/2010 07:00:00
Lori Oliwenstein

Scientists from the Caltech have provided the first-ever glimpse of the structure of a key protein—gp120—found on the surface of a specific subgroup of the human immunodeficiency virus, HIV-1. In addition, they demonstrated that a particular antibody to gp120 makes contact not only with the protein, but with the CD4 receptor that gp120 uses to gain entrance into the body's T cells.

 

03/03/2010 08:00:00
Deborah Williams-Hedges

Caltech graduate student Heather D. Agnew is the recipient of the 2010 $30,000 Lemelson-MIT Caltech Student Prize. Agnew is among the four $30,000 Lemelson-MIT Collegiate Student Prize winners. She was recognized for her integral contributions to the development of innovative biochemical protocols that can be utilized for more stable, robust—and inexpensive—detection of diseases like cancer, HIV, or malaria.

04/22/2009 07:00:00
Lori Oliwenstein

Some 25 years after the AIDS epidemic spawned a worldwide search for an effective vaccine against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), progress in the field seems to have effectively become stalled. The reason? According to new findings from a team of researchers from Caltech, it's at least partly due to the fact that our body's natural HIV antibodies simply don't have a long enough reach to effectively neutralize the viruses they are meant to target.  

10/13/2008 07:00:00
Kathy Svitil
The transportation of antibodies from a mother to her newborn child is vital for the development of that child's nascent immune system. Those antibodies, donated by transfer across the placenta before birth or via breast milk after birth, help shape a baby's response to foreign pathogens and may influence the later occurrence of autoimmune diseases. Images from biologists at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have revealed for the first time the complicated process by which these antibodies are shuttled from mother's milk, through her baby's gut, and into the bloodstream, and offer new insight into the mammalian immune system.
04/21/2008 07:00:00
Jill Perry
As conventional means fail to conquer Africa's deadliest diseases-- HIV and malaria--researchers are starting to look outside the box. One solution might be Nobelist David Baltimore's novel approach to combating HIV through gene therapy. He will give the headlining lecture at the Symposium on African Health at the California Institute of Technology May 3 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in Ramo Auditorium on the Caltech campus in Pasadena. Admission is free.
 
11/29/2007 08:00:00
Kathy Svitil
Research institutions across Southern California have joined forces to advance stem cell research by establishing the Southern California Stem Cell Scientific Collaboration (SC3). Members of the collaboration include the California Institute of Technology; University of Southern California; Childrens Hospital Los Angeles; City of Hope; the University of California, Santa Barbara; and the House Ear Institute.
 
06/30/2005 07:00:00
Jill Perry
The Grand Challenges in Global Health initiative, a major effort to achieve scientific breakthroughs against diseases that kill millions of people each year in the world's poorest countries, today offered 43 grants totaling $436.6 million for a broad range of innovative research projects involving scientists in 33 countries, including David Baltimore, president of the California Institute of Technology. The ultimate goal of the initiative is to create "deliverable technologies"--health tools that are not only effective, but also inexpensive to produce, easy to distribute, and simple to use in developing countries.
 
10/20/2004 07:00:00
Deborah Williams-Hedges
In response to the arduously slow progress in finding cures for AIDS and cancer, Caltech researchers are now investigating a promising new approach in the treatment of these diseases.
 
06/27/2003 07:00:00
Robert Tindol

With over 40 million people worldwide currently living with HIV/AIDS and millions more becoming infected each year, a group of scientists is calling for a coordinated global HIV vaccine enterprise

 
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