Earth and Environment News

04/23/2014 09:41:30
Kathy Svitil
Today's Earth Week feature highlights three cross-disciplinary research centers where Caltech scientists and engineers collaborate on projects that will have a positive impact on energy, the environment, and Earth's sustainable future.
06/03/2013 10:55:17
Kimm Fesenmaier

PASADENA, Calif.—For the second year in a row, a faculty member from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) has been awarded the Eni Award in Renewable and Non-Conventional Energy.

05/02/2013 14:36:00
Kimm Fesenmaier
Based on their distinguished achievements in original research, three Caltech professors—Mike Brown, Ken Farley, and John Seinfeld—are among the newly elected members and foreign associates.
04/25/2013 10:37:00
Douglas Smith
Los Angeles has had bouts of smog since the turn of the 20th century. Angelenos might now be living in a state of perpetual midnight—assuming we could live here at all—were it not for the work of Caltech professor Arie Jan Haagen-Smit.
04/23/2013 23:32:56
Douglas Smith
John Grotzinger, Caltech’s Fletcher Jones Professor of Geology and project scientist for Curiosity—JPL’s newest Mars rover, exploring the floor of Gale Crater—will describe its discoveries so far during a free public lecture on Wednesday, April 24.
03/15/2013 10:26:45
Brian Bell

Research Corporation for Science Advancement (RCSA) has named Theodor Agapie, an assistant professor of chemistry at Caltech, a 2013 Cottrell Scholar.

02/11/2013 14:14:33
Douglas Smith
What makes an earthquake go off? Why are earthquakes so difficult to forecast? Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Geophysics Nadia Lapusta gives us a close-up look at the moving parts, as it were, at 8:00 p.m. on Wednesday, February 13, 2013, in Caltech's Beckman Auditorium. Admission is free.
01/31/2013 11:16:14
Katie Neith
The recent renovations of the Jorgensen Laboratory included many upgrades that were designed to reflect Caltech's commitment to sustainability. Now the building has achieved LEED Platinum certification, the highest honor of the U.S. Green Building Council.
01/14/2013 10:45:28
Katie Neith
In December 2011, Caltech mineral-physics expert Jennifer Jackson reported that she and a team of researchers had used diamond-anvil cells to compress tiny samples of iron—the main element of the earth's core. By squeezing the samples to reproduce the extreme pressures felt at the core, the team was able to get a closer estimate of the melting point of iron. At the time, the measurements that the researchers made were unprecedented in detail. Now, they have taken that research one step further by adding infrared laser beams to the mix.
01/09/2013 10:03:56
Katie Neith
In an earthquake, ground motion is the result of waves emitted when the two sides of a fault move—or slip—rapidly past each other, with an average relative speed of about three feet per second. Not all fault segments move so quickly, however—some slip slowly, through a process called creep, and are considered to be "stable," or not capable of hosting rapid earthquake-producing slip. One common hypothesis suggests that such creeping fault behavior is persistent over time, with currently stable segments acting as barriers to fast-slipping, shake-producing earthquake ruptures. But a new study by researchers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) shows that this might not be true.
12/06/2012 00:01:15
Shayna Chabner McKinney
One of the most powerful computer clusters available to a single department in the academic world just got stronger. The California Institute of Technology's CITerra supercomputer, a high-performance computing cluster of the type popularly known as a Beowulf cluster, was replaced this year with a faster and more efficient system.
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