News articles tagged with "cancer"

11/17/2015 09:55:11
Douglas Smith
The road to becoming a T cell is fraught with choices, false starts, and dead ends, where a regulatory tug-of-war brings cells surprisingly close to the border of leukemia.
Fluorescence-labeled immature T cells
03/21/2010 18:00:00
Jon Weiner

A Caltech-led team of researchers and clinicians has published the first proof that a targeted nanoparticle—used as an experimental therapeutic and injected directly into a patient's bloodstream—can traffic into tumors, deliver double-stranded small interfering RNAs, and turn off an important cancer gene using a mechanism known as RNA interference. Moreover, the team demonstrated that this new type of therapy can make its way to human tumors in a dose-dependent fashion.

03/03/2010 08:00:00
Deborah Williams-Hedges

Caltech graduate student Heather D. Agnew is the recipient of the 2010 $30,000 Lemelson-MIT Caltech Student Prize. Agnew is among the four $30,000 Lemelson-MIT Collegiate Student Prize winners. She was recognized for her integral contributions to the development of innovative biochemical protocols that can be utilized for more stable, robust—and inexpensive—detection of diseases like cancer, HIV, or malaria.

12/16/2009 08:00:00
Jon Weiner

Caltech and UCLA have announced the establishment of the Joint Center for Translational Medicine (JCTM), which will advance experimental research into clinical applications, including the diagnosis and therapy of diseases such as cancer.

06/18/2009 07:00:00
Lori Oliwenstein

The cells in our body are constantly receiving mixed messages. An epithelial cell might be exposed to one signal telling it to divide and, simultaneously, another telling it to stop dividing. The tug-of-war between these two sets of influences, and the effects they have on tissue growth, are explained and explored in a paper authored by scientists from Caltech and published online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

03/30/2009 09:00:00
Lori Oliwenstein

Combining a compound known as a gallium corrole with a protein carrier results in a targeted cancer therapy that is able to detect and eliminate tumors in mice with seemingly fewer side effects than other breast-cancer treatments, says a team of researchers from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), the Israel Institute of Technology (Technion) and the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center.

10/17/2008 07:00:00
Lori Oliwenstein
Engineers from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have created a "plug-and-play" synthetic RNA device--a sort of eminently customizable biological computer--that is capable of taking in and responding to more than one biological or environmental signal at a time.
01/28/2008 08:00:00
Kathy Svitil
If humans had see-through skin like a jellyfish, spotting disease like cancer would be a snap: Just look, and see a tumor form or grow.
01/07/2008 08:00:00
Jacqueline Scahill
With the aim of developing innovative ways to detect and treat cancer, researchers at the California Institute of Technology, UCLA, and the Institute for Systems Biology (ISB) in Seattle have joined together to create the Nanosystems Biology Cancer Center (NSBCC).
11/29/2007 08:00:00
Kathy Svitil
Research institutions across Southern California have joined forces to advance stem cell research by establishing the Southern California Stem Cell Scientific Collaboration (SC3). Members of the collaboration include the California Institute of Technology; University of Southern California; Childrens Hospital Los Angeles; City of Hope; the University of California, Santa Barbara; and the House Ear Institute.
08/13/2007 07:00:00
Robert Tindol
If a new approach to cancer therapy, still experimental and in a phase I clinical trial, turns out as well as hoped, the credit will go as much to technology transfer as to scientific acumen.
Subscribe to Caltech News tagged with "cancer"