News articles tagged with "Caltech_history"

01/23/2015 10:33:21
Douglas Smith
Fredric ("Fred") Raichlen, professor emeritus of civil and mechanical engineering in Caltech's Division of Engineering and Applied Science, passed away on December 13, 2014. He was an expert in coastal engineering whose pioneering studies of tsunami mechanics have led to standards for designing tsunami-resistant structures that have saved lives around the world.
Fred Raichlen
04/04/2006 07:00:00
Deborah Williams-Hedges
April 18 marks the centennial of the great 1906 San Francisco earthquake. In commemoration of that event and the landmark developments that followed it, the California Institute of Technology Archives is presenting a new digital exhibit, Documenting Earthquakes: A Virtual Exhibit in Six Parts. This online display, for use by the public, media, and educators, can be viewed at http://archives.caltech.edu/exhibits/earthquake/index.html.
 
05/04/2005 07:00:00
Deborah Williams-Hedges
Widely regarded as one of the most influential physicists of the 20th Century, Nobel laureate and Caltech professor Richard P. Feynman will be honored on a 2005 U.S. postage commemorative stamp. The stamp will be unveiled locally at a celebration on Friday, May 20, at 5 p.m. in Ramo Auditorium on the California Institute of Technology campus. The public is invited to attend this free event. Caltech will offer a limited-edition special commemorative envelope bearing the four stamps that compose the American Scientists series, and a special cancellation stamp from the Feynman Station at Caltech. Stamps and cachets, as well as Feynman books and memorabilia, will be available for purchase.
 
04/19/2005 07:00:00
Robert Tindol
The famed geneticist Ed Lewis won his Nobel Prize for his breakthroughs in understanding how genes relate to embryonic development. But for four years in World War II, he served as a U.S. Army meteorologist.
 
03/09/2005 08:00:00
In 1905, Albert Einstein single-handedly formulated the theory of special relativity, demonstrated that light traveling in discrete units is responsible for the photoelectric effect, and calculated how microscopic collisions could account for the phenomenon known as Brownian motion. Any one of the three discoveries would have assured his enduring fame as a physicist.
 
02/19/2005 08:00:00

A new, grassroots computing project dubbed Einstein@Home, which will let anyone with a personal computer contribute to cutting-edge astrophysics research, is being officially announced today at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). California Institute of Technology physics professor Barry Barish will make the announcement during a press briefing at 11 a.m.

 
03/18/2004 08:00:00
Marcus Woo

PASADENA, Calif. -- In the mid-1930s, Arnold O.

 
02/18/2004 08:00:00
Deborah Williams-Hedges
"In 1919, during the summer, when I was eighteen years old, I had been in southern Oregon as a paving engineer, a paving plant inspector, working for a contractor. . . And at the end of the summer, I did not have money enough to return for my junior year at Oregon Agricultural College. So I didn't return. I'd been sending my money to my mother, who was a widow and was having a hard time...."
 
06/26/2003 07:00:00
Jill Perry
PASADENA, Calif.
 
05/14/2003 07:00:00
Einstein Archives to Be Available Online
 
04/01/1997 08:00:00
Robert Tindol

PASADENA—The historic 10-foot wind tunnel at the California Institute of Technology will pass into the aviation-history books on April 30, when it

 
Subscribe to Caltech News tagged with "Caltech_history"