News articles tagged with "chemical_engineering"

04/01/2014 16:31:34
Kimm Fesenmaier

One day while casually reading a review article, Caltech chemical engineer Mikhail Shapiro came across a mention of gas vesicles—tiny gas-filled structures used by some photosynthetic microorganisms to control buoyancy. It was a light-bulb moment.

06/18/2009 07:00:00
Lori Oliwenstein

The cells in our body are constantly receiving mixed messages. An epithelial cell might be exposed to one signal telling it to divide and, simultaneously, another telling it to stop dividing. The tug-of-war between these two sets of influences, and the effects they have on tissue growth, are explained and explored in a paper authored by scientists from Caltech and published online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

03/23/2009 21:00:00
Kathy Svitil

Researchers at Caltech and world-leading gene-synthesis company DNA2.0 have taken an important step toward the development of a cost-efficient process to extract sugars from cellulose--the world's most abundant organic material and cheapest form of solar-energy storage. Plant sugars are easily converted into a variety of renewable fuels such as ethanol or butanol.

11/06/2008 08:00:00
Lori Oliwenstein
Four members of the 11-member chemical engineering faculty at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) were honored by the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) in their list of 100 Chemical Engineers of the Modern Era, published in the October issue of their magazine, Chemical Engineering Progress.
10/17/2008 07:00:00
Lori Oliwenstein
Engineers from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have created a "plug-and-play" synthetic RNA device--a sort of eminently customizable biological computer--that is capable of taking in and responding to more than one biological or environmental signal at a time.
08/15/2008 07:00:00
Kathy Svitil
Researchers at the California Institute of Technology have developed a novel way to churn out large quantities of drugs, including antiplaque toothpaste additives, antibiotics, nicotine, and even morphine, using mini biofactories--in yeast.
01/22/2008 08:00:00
elisabeth nadin
California Institute of Technology student Vivek Narsimhan has been awarded a Churchill Scholarship for the academic year 2008–09. The chemical engineering major plans to complete the Certificate in Advanced Mathematics (Maths Part III) at Churchill College, University of Cambridge.
 
01/10/2008 08:00:00
Kathy Svitil
Supernarrow silicon wires, or silicon nanowires, are laying the foundation for a new type of cheap yet energy-efficient microscopic refrigeration, with no moving parts, report researchers from the California Institute of Technology in a study published today in the journal Nature.
 
01/07/2008 08:00:00
Jacqueline Scahill
With the aim of developing innovative ways to detect and treat cancer, researchers at the California Institute of Technology, UCLA, and the Institute for Systems Biology (ISB) in Seattle have joined together to create the Nanosystems Biology Cancer Center (NSBCC).
 
08/13/2007 07:00:00
Robert Tindol
If a new approach to cancer therapy, still experimental and in a phase I clinical trial, turns out as well as hoped, the credit will go as much to technology transfer as to scientific acumen.
 
07/05/2007 07:00:00
Robert Tindol
Applied physicists at the California Institute of Technology have figured out a way to detect single biological molecules with a microscopic optical device. The method has already proven effective for detecting the signaling proteins called cytokines that indicate the function of the immune system, and it could be used in numerous medical applications, such as the extremely early detection of cancer and other diseases, as well as in basic biological research.
 
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